Bruce Watson [free Read] Freedom Summer – Book or DOC


  • Paperback
  • 369
  • Freedom Summer
  • Bruce Watson
  • English
  • 03 September 2019
  • 9780143119432

10 thoughts on “Freedom Summer

  1. says:

    At book club a friend of mine told a story He's a teacher and he works in a very diverse school He's white but

  2. says:

    This descriptive detailed history makes for difficult reading at times I grew up in the segregated South and remember when the three civil rights workers disappeared Thank goodness things have changed with a long way to go At any rate I learned uite a lot from reading Freedom Summer

  3. says:

    Summer of 1964 I was sitting in my diapers sniffing the Topanga Canyon breezes and watching the snakes and tarantulas go by so I think I can be forgiven for not knowing what was going on in Mississippi If you've seen the 1988 film Mississippi Burning you know about the three young men two white and one black who disappeared on the first ni

  4. says:

    I remember the summer of 1964 very well I watched most of it on the TV evening news where I gathered with fellow Peace Corps trainees in the evenings at Indiana University and for two weeks at Indiana State in Terra Haute We had classes all day history of Africa and Sierra Leone public health lectures phys ed Krio language etc etc It was really like going to summer school except that we all lived together in uonset huts left ove

  5. says:

    Freedom Summer The Savage Season of 1964 That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy or Freedom Summer is a non

  6. says:

    Usually a history book is NOT what I would pick up but after trying civil disobedience this summer and finding parallels with the civil right

  7. says:

    This book was an eye opener I was vaguely aware that the South during the Jim Crow era was a festering hellhole; but I was

  8. says:

    Despite having already read a number of books about the degradations that the South and Mississippi in particular have inflicted upon the blacks after the Civil War I was terribly moved by this book In essence this book is about the summer of 1964 in which great efforts were made to allow the blacks of Mississippi to have the same rights of c

  9. says:

    Freedom Summer tells the story of Mississippi during the summer of 1964 when hundreds of college students from across the US traveled to Mississippi to open Freedom Schools run voter registration drives and education and support African Americans stepping into County Courthouses to register to vote It was a summer of terror for all

  10. says:

    Ask just about anyone on the street about the Civil Rights Movement and you'll get the same answer from probably everyone the same names will be dropped JFK King Rosa Parks Malcolm X It's a short list and an incredibly in

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Bruce Watson ↠ 9 READ

Freedom Summer

A riveting account of one of the most remarkable episodes in American history In his critically acclaimed history Freedom Summer award winning author Bruce Watson presents powerful testimony about a crucial episode in the American civil rights movement During the sweltering summer. At book club a friend of mine told a story He s a teacher and he works in a very diverse school He s white but he s very sensitive to the racial dynamics currently at play in The United States Trayvon Martin Michael Brown Eric GarnerHe asked a colleague of his a black teacher born in Mississippi in the early 60s what she thought about what s happeningHe said Do you feel like Oh no Here we go again Her response was Not here we go again like will it ever end It s difficult for those of us who have never been oppressed genuinely oppressed to put ourselves into the shoes of those who have lived through long term systematic oppressionAnd sure we can talk about progress and the progress has been good But I remind myself of a uote by Malcolm You don t stick a knife in a man s back nine inches and then pull it out six inches and say you re making progress No matter how much respect no matter how much recognition whites show towards me as far as I am concerned as long as it is not shown to everyone of our people in this country it doesn t exist for meAbove all the book Freedom Summer did 2 things for me It reminded me that the civil rights movement was expansive And it reminded me that people can make a differenceIf you re up for it take 30 seconds to close your eyes and list as many civil rights leaders as you canNow I don t know if you were able to list 2 or a thousand I bet I can list than most people because I m a social studies teacher but as in many areas of my life I feel like there is so much I don t knowI bet Dr King and Rosa Parks made the list Did anybody else Maybe Malcolm X Maybe Ralph Abernathy Maybe John Lewis Definitely Martin Luther King Jr Definitely Rosa Parks Maybe you saw Drunk History so you know about Claudette Colvin Maybe Bob Moses Probably MLK and Rosa ParksHere s the point a movement isn t made of one or two people It s made of thousands and thousands of people risking something Now maybe you say they weren t all the thousands and thousands leaders and that s a fair argument But it was than Dr King and his SCLC It was than SNCCThis book narrowed in and focused on one small portion of the Civil Rights Movement Freedom Summer The 1964 voter drive in MississippiSometimes it s crazy to think about how far we aren t removed from segregation From the racist policies of our past My mother who happens to be fantastic drank from segregated water fountains She went to a segregated school I should probably interview her about this sometimeI m only 33 I m not talking about my great grandmother I m talking about my mom The one who made me peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and told me to go outside and playIn 1964 an integrated group of people mainly students went into Mississippi to try to register African AmericansSuffice it to say it was slow goingThey weren t well received at least not by the establishment The police were constantly harassing them The Klan with all it s klonfusing language klept after them Burning klrosses in their yards throwing Molotov Klocktails through the windows May I just interject here that I find that Klan language ridiculous I realize this won t win me too many Klan friends but I couldn t help but laugh at the parts that mentioned the Klaverns or the Klan Klongress and its Klonstitution Or whateverOf course this was a problem for the Northerns too They d gone down to help and during training the volunteers were watching a CBS documentary on Mississippi disenfranchising black voters Volunteers seethed or sat disgusted But then the camera fell on a hideously fat man in a white shirt and horn rimmed glasses Laughter rippled through the auditorium SNCC staffers fumed This was no comical stereotype This was Theron Lynd registrar in Forrest County who had never registered a Negro until hit by a lawsuit The audience uieted as a black man onscreen told of a shotgun fired into his home wounding two little girls but when his wife came on in a funny hat some giggled Several SNCCs stormed out When the documentary ended another jumped onstage You should be ashamed You could laugh at that film We don t get it We hear words like Klongress and laugh at the ridiculousness of Klanspeak Klanguage WhatkleverBut we forget that these are real people Who lynch real people Who sit around laughing as they re being tried for murder knowing there s no way in hell they re going to be convicted They re white Protecting white civilizationHere s a picture mentioned towards the end of the book in reference to that last paragraph The SNCCs were right We should be ashamed for laughing By the way if you clicked on the Claudette Colvin drunk history link above the same point is made that Klanspeak is ridiculous but really maybe I shouldn t be laughing at that jokeSlight aside I had some students using Ebola as a joke in class the other day and a third student flipped out on them I m pretty sure they d seen it on Family Guy or South Park or something But this other student just eviscerated them for laughing at something that is literally destroying people s lives At their insensitivity At their immaturityIt was good for me to read this book To see that individual people can change things They have to give up their comforts but it can be doneIt was good to see add another layer to what I know To fully explore the depth of the Civil Rights movement To learn the names Fannie Lou Hamer and Bob MosesI want to go up to my friend s teacher friend and tell her YES It will end And I m going to help end it I m only one person but then so is everybody elseMississippi Goddam

DOWNLOAD õ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ↠ Bruce Watson

Of 1964 than seven hundred American college students descended upon segregated reactionary Mississippi to register black voters and educate black children On the night of their arrival the worst fears of a race torn nation were realized when three young men disappeared thought to h. I remember the summer of 1964 very well I watched most of it on the TV evening news where I gathered with fellow Peace Corps trainees in the evenings at Indiana University and for two weeks at Indiana State in Terra Haute We had classes all day history of Africa and Sierra Leone public health lectures phys ed Krio language etc etc It was really like going to summer school except that we all lived together in uonset huts left over from WWII and stuck together because we never had a free minute from 7 in the morning till 9 or 10 at nightBefore 1964 I had never been particularly tuned in to Civil Rights I don t even remember hearing about the murder of Emmit Till until many years later but 1964 was the summer when SNCC volunteers mostly college students from the north went to Mississippi to run Freedom Schools and help the blacks register to vote often having to convince them first that they deserved to take the same role as the whites in a democracy And it was the summer when 3 Civil Rights workers were murdered by a bunch 18 19 of racists and KKK members who got a backhoe and buried them under a dam being built It took all summer for the FBI to find informants who eventually led them to the bodies It was the summer when the country was really shocked to discover that white Mississippi would stoop to beatings and murder to preserve their way of life ie to keep blacks in their place It was also the summer where the Freedom Democrats tried unsuccessfully to get seated at the Democratic convention to supplement or replace the illegally chosen white Democrats And I felt twinges of guilt all summer I was going to Africa to help blacks and not going to Mississippi because I wanted to see the world other cultures etc When at the airport in NY a man laughed at us and said IF you want to help blacks I can just take you to Harlem and you can work there You don t have to go to Africa I felt another twinge I was tuned into JFK s Ask Not message but from the first tuned into the Peace Corps as the chance of a lifetime to see the world no one else saw in those days ordinary people who went abroad went to Europe and that s about allBruce Watson s book is a worthwhile read especially for those who don t know much about the Civil Rights movement and about this experiment by America s young liberals It will be an eye opener Although Watson slides into some purplish prose every once in awhile which I didn t mind because I shared his views this is an excellent history of Freedom Summer As well as profiling the leaders and providing an excellent overview of Mississippi history since the Civil War it focuses on four of the volunteers who they were why they joined what happened to them in Mississippi even where they are now The murder of Chaney Goodwin and Schwerner is a story that s told piece by piece since though the murder happened on the first day of Freedom Summer June 21st it reverberated through the whole period as the mystery of their disappearance was gradually unraveled in all its sordidness And in the end Mississippi refused to prosecute anyone and the only trial was when the Federal government brought suit for Civil Rights violations which the defendants laughed at And while that murder was undoubtedly the worst thing that happened during Freedom Summer it was certainly not the only violence Watson even tells the story of an insurance agent who defended the the work of Freedom Summer and as a result his business was ruined his family harassed and they were eventually forced to move out of the state Violence was meted out to blacks who dared to want to register as well as to the uppity Northerners Jews and Communists who presumed to challenge Mississippi ways and help them And if you wonder why Mississippi than any other southern state Watson tackles that uestion tooThe final chapters of the book focus on the impact of Freedom Summer particularly on the heart breaking defeat at the Democratic Convention A mealy mouth compromise was reached and Humbert Humphrey cried too when he proposed it Lyndon Johnson knew he couldn t seat the Freedom Democrats without taking the very great risk that Goldwater would be elected when the entire Southern delegation left the Democrats as they threatened He tasked Humphrey with seeing that the delegation wasn t seated Politics trumped conscience on that one But Watson also chronicles how Mississippi changed and changed relatively uickly after the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and after the awful publicity from Freedom Summer business and tourism were affected seriously Many citizens who had been afraid to speak out when the voices of hate ruled began to make themselves heard Mississippi with a majority of black citizens began to let blacks register and win some electionsNot all of the blowback from Freedom Summer was benign SNCC became increasingly divided over the issue of nonviolence Stokley Carmichael and others moved to black power and discouraged the participation of whites in Civil Rights issues Violence broke out in Northern cities proving that racist and bigotry were not exclusively Southern phenomena

FREE READ Freedom Summer

Ave been murdered by the Ku Klux Klan Taking readers into the heart of these remarkable months Freedom Summer shines new light on a critical moment of nascent change in AmericaRecreates the texture of that terrible yet rewarding summer with impressive verisimilitude Washington Post. Freedom Summer tells the story of Mississippi during the summer of 1964 when hundreds of college students from across the US traveled to Mississippi to open Freedom Schools run voter registration drives and education and support African Americans stepping into County Courthouses to register to vote It was a summer of terror for all for African Americans standing watch with rifles and shotguns to the young students whom they were protecting White Mississippians were terrified of the changes to come from the invasion of these outsiders which included the FBI This is the summer told of in the film Mississippi Burning in which 3 civil rights workers are murdered One of the most interesting chapters of the book is the epilogue which tells of the reaction of the civil rights workers and the residents of Mississippi Whites were outraged that once again they were shown at their racist worst when they have made progress in Mississippi The civil rights workers were outraged that Blacks were shown as helpless and the FBI were heroes This was not the case in the summer of 1964 I do most of my reading by audiobook and Freedom Summer was a good choice for my commute Performer David Drummond held my attention and engaged my imagination with subtle shifts in voice to indicate speakers His accents from New England to the Deep South were effective and never sounded fake The story is told through extensive research with interviews and letters so that the voices of the civil rights workers are clear Freedom Summer is highly recommended as an education for those not yet born in 1964 and a reminder to those who were that there are still pockets of poverty and racism in the USA


About the Author: Bruce Watson

Bruce Watson is the author of Light A Radiant History from Creation to the uantum Age Bloomsbury Feb 2016 Starting with creation stories and following the trail of luminescence through three millennia Light explores how humanity has worshiped captured studied painted and finally controlled light The book's cast of characters includes Plato Ptolemy Alhacen Dante Leonardo Rembr