[PDF] AJAYA RISE OF KALI Book 2 ✓ Anand Neelakantan – subtense.co.uk


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  • AJAYA RISE OF KALI Book 2
  • Anand Neelakantan
  • English
  • 02 June 2018
  • null

10 thoughts on “AJAYA RISE OF KALI Book 2

  1. says:

    Video Review Link job by Anand Neelakantan Ajaya Roll of The Dice Part 1 Rise of Kali Part 2 is an epic written by Anand Neelakantan which shows Mahabharata from Duryodhana's point of view I was unjust and hasty when I have written review of part 1 but I will correct my review as I have completed both the parts I will re write review for complete series AjayaFrom our childhood either we heard or watched On Doordarshan stories the

  2. says:

    I have said it before and I will say it again It is always a refreshing experience to read Anand Neelakantan’s b

  3. says:

    I have always believed in the policy – if you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything at allSo when I did not uite like Amish’s Scion of IkshvakuI decided not to put down my reaction in words But Rise of Kali has actually disappointed me to a level that I am going to write a detailed review o

  4. says:

    Anand Neelakantan's book starts with what seems like an apology for exploring the alternate POV It talks about

  5. says:

    I have desperately waited for than a year to read the concluding part of Ajaya The author himself was extremely tight lipped about the release date and it has finally come almost a year after it was originally slated for release Considering all this anticipation there was no way the book actually would live up to what I wanted it to And it doesnt But it is still a really good honest effort The book succeeds best when it gives voi

  6. says:

    The Rise of Kali raises the uestion why the history never considered the virtues of the vanuished? Suryodhana was the voice of a castles society which weighed the individual with merits He accepted Karna the son

  7. says:

    'Rise of Kali Duryodhana's Mahabharata' is the second book in the Ajaya series Aptly titled 'Ajaya' the series is Anand Neelakantan's counterpoint to the traditional rendition of the Mahabharata or Jaya which casts the Pandavas in a victorious as well as righteous lightIn Ajaya Neelakantan establishes the reason

  8. says:

    I received a signed copy of this book for free through Goodreads First Reads The views expressed here are my own and unbiased3 starsThe blurb sounded so promisingThe author has turned such a great epic into a horrid RetellingThe story started with Draupadi being dragged from her chambers to the sabha where the unspeakable cheerhar

  9. says:

    This book begins from the most infamous and the most poignant chapter of Mahabharata The dice game in which Pandavas' lose their entire wealth kingdom and eventually they end up losing their wife by gambling over a dice game

  10. says:

    i had already read ajaya I and was waiting for part II for a long time it does not fail to disappoint the book

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Anand Neelakantan ✓ 4 Download

AJAYA RISE OF KALI Book 2

THE MAHABHARATA ENDURES AS THE GREAT EPIC OF INDIA While Jaya is the story of the Pandavas told from the perspective of the victors of Kurukshetra Ajaya is the tale of the Kauravas who were decimated to the last man From the pen of the author who gave voice to Ravana in the national bestseller ASURA comes the riveting narrative which compels us to uestion the truth behind the Mahabharata THE DARK AGE OF KALI IS RISING and every man and woman must choose between duty and conscience honour and shame life and death o The Pandavas banished to the forest following the disastrous games of dice return to Hastinapura o Draupadi has vowed not to bind her hair till she washes it in the blood of the Kauravas. I have always believed in the policy if you don t have anything nice to say don t say anything at allSo when I did not uite like Amish s Scion of IkshvakuI decided not to put down my reaction in words But Rise of Kali has actually disappointed me to a level that I am going to write a detailed review of it Firstly I would like to make it clear I am aware that I am nowhere near Amish s or Anand Neelakantan s level of excellence to actually review their work They both are great authors But this review is of a reader s reaction than a critical evaluation of the bookSo here I go Firstly I want to make a reuest to these authors please don t try to fit your books in a set formula The similarity I found in both these books is that they used the same formula Reflect social and political situation of current India in the Bharatkhanda of that time bring out the issue of rapes talk about the caste system etc etc Both have tried too hard to connect situations prevalent today with ancient IndiaNow talking about Rise of Kali in specific when I started reading Ajaya 1 I was mighty impressed till the first half of the book was over I was almost sure this book would be one of my favourite books But the second half actually shattered my hopes The plot which seemed very clever with all characters having different views on the same subject none of them being evil suddenly took a U turn and resorted to the good vs bad cliche It no longer remained to be the intelligent clash of ideologies but just about the good Duryodhan bad Pandavas and the vicious Krishna Yes now coming to the parts that hurt yes hurt me the most Let s talk about the beginning itself The vastraharan of Draupadi The author has skipped through the incident as though it s some trivial irrelevant incident Many people including me actually believe it to be one of the main reasons behind the Mahabharat war He has not even been clear about what exactly happens Is she saved or not If yes by whom It made me appreciate the wonderful interpretation in Chitra Banerjee s book Palace of Illusions But in this book author has conveniently skipped through the incidentNext is the portrayal of Krishna Like any normal Indian kid I have grown up listening to stories of Krishna As I grew up and started reading mythology I perceived him not as God but as an extraordinary human being none the less So I am completely fine with accepting that Krishna may not have been a God But putting him out to be some kind of dhongi baba There I have a problem You can t ridicule such an important character of Mahabharata just like that Also though the author has given references to Krishna s divine fake magical powers he has nowhere explained how Krishna managed to showcase them The author could have just lifted the veil of divinity and portrayed him as a normal person with vice and virtues But he has used Krishna s divine status instead to show him in bad light Really great men not necessarily good till today are elevated to the level of God though they are not They don t necessarily have to be God or dhongi babas They can just be extra ordinary human beings Also Krishna is shown to be hell bent on bringing Duryodhan down But if he really wanted that he would have never tried to settle for five villages But I have to say at least in Rise of Kali he has reduced the intensity with which he wished to portray Krishna when he first introduced his character in Ajaya 1 Now let s leave aside the emotions and talk about facts First the story of Samba Krishna s son being a rapist and raping Duryodhana s daughter Lakshmana I have never come across any reference to this incident To write this review I have done some research as well The findings reaffirm my knowledge and state that Samba wanted to marry Lakshmana but she refused So he kidnapped her and got caught Later Balaram and not Krishna comes to rescue him And as no one is ready to marry Lakshmana she being abducted once she is married to Samba I could nowhere find reference to any rape of Lakhsmana by Samba or murder of Eklavya by Krishna because of that And ps I completely sympathise with the unfair treatment with which Eklavya was met I deduct one point from team Pandava for that though I will not conveniently give that point to team Kaurava Also if Duryodhan was such a fair and nice person how did he give his daughter away to a rapist Next the story of Iravan Mahabharat states Iravan died in the Kurikshetra war Was rather killed in an unfair manner when fighting Shakuni Also if one tries to refer the South folklore it states Iravan voluntarily sacrificed himselfI prefer to believe original version than folklores Moving ahead as the author has given references to Geeta verses in the book I also would like to uote one which summarises the reason behind the Mahabharat war for me If you don t fight for what you want then don t cry for what you lost And what is clear is that the throne of Hastinapur was something both Pandavas and Kauravas desired It was nobody s right by birth except Bhishma Dhritharashtra was as illegitimate a child as the Pandavas That makes Duryodhan also an illegitimate son of the Kuru clan Next the character of Dhaumya As far as I recollect his reference in Mahabharat he met the pandavas during their exile when they were on their way to attend Draupadi s swayamvar He was referred to the Pandavas as their Kul guru by some Gandharva I would like to know the author s background reference that made him portray Dhaumya as the chief villain Next is the character of Yuyutsu As far as Mahabharat goes Yuyutsu s character is somewhat similar to Vibhishana from Ramayan Frustrated with the humiliation and unfair treatment at the hands of his brothers Kauravas he provides intelligence information to Pandavas for the war It has been very clear in the epic that Kauravas treated him badly due to his mother being a low caste This makes me wonder Duryodhana who respected and loved Karna the sutaputra how could he neglect and disrespect his own step brother Was his friendship towards Karna only because of his superiority against Pandavas Also it brings into uestion the entire ideaology which Duryodhana is shown to have in this book The ideaolgy that defines and defends him in this book I would also like to point out that when Pandavas along with Draupadi decided to leave for the Himalayas they left Yuyutsu as the guardian of Parikhshit despite him being Dhritharashtra s son and technically a kaurava plus a low caste He was also made the king of Indraprastha If they really believed in caste hierarchy and propagated animosity why would they leave their grandson and Kingdom with YuyutsuMoving ahead I would like to point out the convenient assumptions made in the book like Shalya was not tricked but voluntarily supported Kauravas Narayani sena was not asked for by Duryodhana but they themselves supported him and not their commander which is unheard of as Kshatriyas prided themselves of the virtue of loyalty etc etc Also wherever the epic mentions Duryodhana s misdeeds the author has conveniently ignored it and passed on the blame to someone else palace of lac attempt to murder Bheem etc etc Also I would like to point out that the angle of patriotism which Duryodhana and his friends have shown in the book towards India has logical problems India that time was not Bharat a single country it was Bharatkhanda A collection of many countriesAlso the dark evil way with which scenes are narrated in the book gives me creeps Eg Shikhandi making lewd remarks towards Bhishma during the war he dancing around Drona after he falls etc etc Such style of narration makes the reader s opinion biased unnecessarily as it is not connected to the main incident but just adds thorns to it It is so especially for the readers who are not aware about the original epic in detailI can go on and on about the technicalities But all I want to say is that I was all ears for the story of the vanuished but sadly I was not convinced a single bit I was looking forward to an unbiased practical version where both sides have been show in grey shades with their own rights and wrongs But all I got to read was just a flipped version of the epic

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O Karna must choose between loyalty and gratitude friend and Guru o Aswathama undertakes a perilous mission to the mountains of Gandhara in search of the Evil One o Kunti must decide between her firstborn and her other sons o Guru Drona has to stand with either his favourite disciple or his beloved son o Balarama having failed to convince his brother about the adharma of violence walks the streets of Bharatavarsha spreading the message of peace o Ekalavya is called to make the ultimate sacrifice to uphold a woman’s honour o Jara the beggar sings of Krishna’s love while his blind dog Dharma follows o Shakuni can almost see the realization of his dream to destroy India As the Pandavas stake their. Anand Neelakantan s book starts with what seems like an apology for exploring the alternate POV It talks about Hinduism openness to ideas debates and discussions and uotes Bhagavad Gita of all things to let us know the position of the author Iti te jnananam akhyatamguhyad guhyatram mayavimrisyaitad aseshenayathecchasi tatha kuruI have give you the most confidential of all knowledge Analyse it critically and act as per your wish and understanding The seuel to the impressive Ajaya is actually a let down since it almost faithfully follows Jaya except for places where the author steps out to show how badmisguided the Pandavas were Once the dice were cast at the court of Hastinapur it was difficult to make Suyodhana the righteous prince And so he is painted an emotional idealistic fool who is a bad administrator Not really the stance I would expect after the first bookThe stories of Karna and Ekalavya are somewhat newer Ekalavya is made out to be the Nishada incarnation of Shiva with many characters seeing the third eye including Krishna He is almost the only one who is not manipulated by the cunning of Shakuni except when he does get manipulated it is to his own end The story line of Samba and Lakshmana was horrific and a jolt Ashwathama s constant need for validation from Suyodhana leads him to deeds beyond his dharma So we have a Kshatriya Suta Brahmin and Nishada team up against the entire society to make it just and inclusive In the end the book only succeeds in villifying Krishna which is not new and retells the many stories from Mahabharata with no new novelty The concept of Dharma is subtle and there are books that have explored it much better Why wasn t the brilliant The difficulty of being good or Yuganta not part of the referencesI felt Suyodhana was let down by many characters in Mahabharata but the most regrettable one was that of this author author who set out to glorify his life It was almost as if he played it saferelatively by making it a zero sum game of no one being happy For someone who was open for an alternate POV the book lost it s way after part 1 But a good attempt nonetheless

Read AJAYA RISE OF KALI Book 2

Claim to the Hastinapura throne the Kaurava Crown Prince Suyodhana rises to challenge Krishna As great minds debate dharma and adharma power hungry men prepare for an apocalyptic war The women highborn and humble helplessly watch the unfolding disaster with deep foreboding And greedy merchants and unscrupulous priests lie in wait like vultures Both sides know that beyond the agony and carnage the winner will take all But even as gods conspire and men’s destinies unfold a far greater truth awaits One of the six most remarkable writers of India DNA An Amazing read The WEEK Uniue voice of a rebellious author telling the story from the other side a feat a few have dared or managed so well Bihar Time. This book begins from the most infamous and the most poignant chapter of Mahabharata The dice game in which Pandavas lose their entire wealth kingdom and eventually they end up losing their wife by gambling over a dice game orchestrated by Shakuni who was playing on behalf of the Kauravas If this situation would have been handled in a respectable manner by the Kauravas probably the entire Kurukshetra war could have been avoidedThe prime highlight of this book has to be the situations in which characters find themselves and how do they react to those situations Their decisions are based on their past influence manoeuvring and manipulation by other characters Vulnerability and indecisiveness of characters and the sinister plans of some of the characters is exposed to the reader with great panache and skill Read a detailed post about this book on my blog


About the Author: Anand Neelakantan

I was born in a uaint little village called Thripoonithura on the outskirts of Cochin Kerala Located east of mainland Ernakulam across Vembanad Lake this village had the distinction of being the seat of the Cochin royal family However it was famous for its hundred odd temples; the various classical artists it produced and its music school I remember many an evening listening to the f