[Margo Jefferson] Negroland A Memoir [yuri Book] Ebook – Epub, Kindle ePUB and eBook Online

Margo Jefferson ¼ 5 Read

Vilege and plenty”   Reckoning with the strictures and demands of Negroland at crucial historical moments the civil rights movement the dawn of feminism the fallacy of postracial America Jefferson brilliantly charts the twists and turns of a life informed by psychological and moral contradictions Aware as it is of heart wrenching despair and depression this book is a triumphant paean to the grace of perseveranc It has taken me a while to actually write a review I ll try to be briefI am a part of the generation after hers who also grew up in the world of sorority functions debutante balls cotillions proper decorum at all times etc The author and my mother and her sisters are the same age and I would say that they look back upon this time in upper middle class Black America uite differently Grantedwe are southernTexan women so that brings a different slant to things certainly Segregation in southern states never really allowed for too many feelings of otherness They were around Black people of all socioeconomic levels all day every day By the time I came along in the late 60searly 70s the family could have moved anywhere but chose not to so that we could have that same sense of balance Our school friends were overwhelmingly white many Jewish but we came home to play in the streets with kids who looked just like us At no point were any of us allowed to flaunt our relative privilege compare skin color or even tease about such things because Black is Black is Black or any of those things that would have exhibited poor manners Of course that s not to say WE weren t teased in the neighborhood and at school but it was always drilled into our heads to be better than rise above and so forth So I didnever even realizing there may have been a choice in the matterPeople are often shocked when I reveal that I am of the fourth generation of college graduates On my maternal side most everyone starting with my great grandfather has a graduate or professional degree I consider myself fortunate to be a part of a family where education was emphasized There is no shame or embarrassment in this as it also allowed us to encourage others to do the same by example in some cases and financially in othersMy 2 stars are less about her feelings because only the author owns those but to the writing I wanted less of her angst and of the story and perhaps analysis Yes excellence was the expectation at all times and I m not sure there is salve to cover the cracks whenever they began to appeareven today But I got out of her NPR interview than I did out of the book so I went in with very high expectations I was left with uestions about her her world today friends viewpointsis she still a member of any of those organizations and how all of that fits in with her upbringing

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Negroland A Memoir

At once incendiary and icy mischievous and provocative celebratory and elegiac here is a deeply felt meditation on race sex and American culture through the prism of the author’s rarefied upbringing and education among a black elite concerned with distancing itself from whites and the black generality while tirelessly measuring itself against both   Born in upper crust black Chicago her father was for years hea Negroland by Margo Jefferson is her memoir of growing up in an upperclass African American household in Chicago during the 1950s and 60s While Jefferson does discuss her upbringing she also discusses what it means for her to be African American in this country in terms of class race and gender From all these anecdotes I gleaned Jefferson s definitive take on race and for this I rate the book 4 stars Margo Jefferson was born in 1947 to Ronald and Irma Jefferson of Chicago s vibrant upper class African American community Ronald a physician and Irma a seamstress desired that their children excel in this country so they enrolled them in University of Chicago Lab School a progressive school which admitted African American students It was in a context with few role models or peers who looked like her that Jefferson learned about race relations in her city While the schools had few people of color prior to the 1964 passage of the eual rights act popular culture contained few others The select few who made it including Lena Horne Dorothy Dandridge and Sammy Davis Jr who did succeed were either cast in stereotypical black roles even when they achieved fame Along with Jackie Robinson on the ball field these Hollywood stars were looked up to by a generation of black children who were likewise not expected to succeed in society Because of the low expectations successful African Americans like the Jeffersons stayed in Negroland a separate society of upper class blacks who created a culture in which their children could achieve greatly in the United States Jefferson was fortunate that her parents taught her and her older sister Denise to be aware of prejudiced behavior On a family trip in 1956 the Jeffersons were looked down upon in an Atlantic Beach New Jersey hotel and only remained one evening Likewise if Margo had to sing a song with derogatory lyrics in school her mother explained to her why it was such and persuaded the primarily white school to change what the students were studying Not all blacks were as fortunate as the Jeffersons however and they even chose to live in upper class Hyde Park where they were surrounded by likeminded blacks and whites as opposed to a lower class African American community This shows to me that class played almost a larger role in Jefferson s upbringing as did race As the feminist movement took shape Margo explained that it was important to view things in the context of class race and gender The early feminist movement was primarily for white women so she chose whether to label herself a feminist or a black rights advocate In this regards she taught people to view race in a lens of one voice and chose which movements to align herself with A successful journalist I found Jefferson s Chicago much different than the North Side I am familiar with Other than the mention of Marshall Fields on State Street Jefferson for all purposes was describing a foreign city to me Before the eual rights act light skinned blacks could choose to pass for white in order to ensure a better future for themselves and their children Likewise successful blacks like the Jeffersons enrolled their children in white schools while still teaching them African American culture through community organizations I found Negroland to be an eye opening experience about life in the African American community in Chicago and enjoyed the prose s structure of alternating anecdotes lists and Jefferson s own story I highly recommend this one voice look in African American class race and gender to all

review Negroland A Memoir

D of pediatrics at Provident at the time the nation’s oldest black hospital; her mother was a socialite Margo Jefferson has spent most of her life among call them what you will the colored aristocracy the colored elite the blue vein society Since the nineteenth century they have stood apart these inhabitants of Negroland “a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of pri Honest talk I would totally have DNFed this if I hadn t felt uncomfortable about not finishing a book on race that everybody else seems to love I just kept hoping for something I just didn t like the writing style at all as it seemed incoherent and disjointed I had a really hard time figuring out if she was uoting from old journals or magazines talking to methe reader or telling a story of her childhood The writing style made the whole story very insubstantial and without a lot of emotional or intellectual heft If you put the word memoir in the title that s what I m going to expect Not some random mishmash of stories and reflections and I don t know even what I get that it s a memoir of what she calls Negroland a specific cultural subset and not the memoir of her life but still nope


10 thoughts on “Negroland A Memoir

  1. says:

    This is a wonderful book The author's story of the slings and arrows of outrageous racism in a country that is supposed to have overcome it's dreadful past now Obama is a two term president is interesting We hear

  2. says:

    Negroland by Margo Jefferson is her memoir of growing up in an upperclass African American household in Chicago during the 1950s and '60s While Jefferson does discuss her upbringing she also discusses what it means for he

  3. says:

    It was very interesting and a rare glimpse into the world of privileged African Americans It is a memoir however it reads less like a novel and like non fictionessay

  4. says:

    Stray thoughts about Negroland What if Roxanne Gay was born 30 years earlier That's what kept running through my mind as I read this book Negroland had a tethered relationship with the pop culture of half a centu

  5. says:

    Honest talk I would totally have DNFed this if I hadn't felt uncomfortable about not finishing a book on race that everybody else seems to love I just kept hoping for something I just didn't like the writing style at all as it seemed incoherent and disjointed I had a really hard time figuring out if she was uoting from old journals or magazines talking to methe reader or telling a story of her childhood The writing style made th

  6. says:

    While evoking another era America in the 1950s and 1960s Margo Jefferson’s Negroland A Memoir is still relevant to the current social and poli

  7. says:

    There was much to absorb and ponder in Margo Jefferson’s Negroland a fascinating recollection of life growing up in the titular purgatory between two worlds centered on race class and wealth in a changing American landscape Jefferson’s parents were well to do professionals “comfortable” as her mother described it to the young curious author rich by black standards upper middle class by white standards Therefore M

  8. says:

    What a waste of a topic What a painful disjointed chaotic rambling I was so excited about reading Negroland I thought the topic would be a rare glimpse into a world that is difficult to infiltrate yet a world that intrigues meI was wrongAs so many reviewers have written it's not a memoir The first 50 or so pages cover a co

  9. says:

    It has taken me a while to actually write a review I'll try to be briefI am a part of the generation after hers who also grew up in the world o

  10. says:

    I enjoyed reading Negroland very much It left me wanting though in almost every category it touched on There are extraordinary thoughts here

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